Services

Frisco Eye Clinic is a full service, private, optometric practice providing a modern optical shop while diagnosing, treating, and managing diseases and disorders of the eye.  

Our doctors treat eye diseases and injuries, prescribe medicine and perform other procedures such as removing foreign bodies from the eye.  They are also licensed to treat glaucoma and also prescribe a number of oral drugs.


Our clinic provides working arrangements with surgical specialists to provide surgical services such as cataract surgery, LASIK, laser surgery, strabismic surgery, and retinal detachments.  You will have peace of mind that your eyes will be comprehensively managed by the best specialists.

COMMON EYE TERMINOLOGY & LINKS

Nearsighted (myopia)
Type of vision in which seeing at far is blurry. Near vision is often good. This condition usually begins between ages 6 to 21 and may gradually worsen until after 30. Contact lenses or glasses are indicated. 

Farsighted (hyperopia)
Type of vision in which seeing is strained at near more than far. Distance vision is often very good. This condition causes your eyes to overwork for reading and other close work and distant viewing. Usual symptoms are headaches and eyestrain. Contact lenses or glasses are indicated.

Astigmatism

Very common and not an eye disease. Symptoms include headaches, eyestrain and squinting. Caused by the eye not focusing light the same up and down as across. Usually occurs in conjunction with myopia or hyperopia. Contact lenses or glasses are indicated.

Presbyopia
A reduction of focusing ability for anything closer than an arm’s length causing blurring and eyestrain. This usually begins in the late 30’s to early 40's and worsens with age. Multifocals (such as progressive no-line multifocals or bifocals) or reading glasses are indicated.

Amblyopia
Often called “lazy eye.” This eye is not able to see 20/20 even with best corrective lenses. Can only be diagnosed by a complete eye examination. Vision therapy is sometimes needed along with glasses. Many cases cannot be helped if they are detected too late.

Glaucoma
A group of diseases that leads to blindness often without any pain or symptoms until late in the disease process.  Currently there is no cure, but with treatment the disease process can be slowed or stalled.  A complete eye examination is needed to diagnose this silent blinder.

Cataract
A normal physiological change that occurs in the lens of all of our eyes as we age.  The young, clear lenses in our eyes become hazy and cloudy as we age leading to a loss of vision and possible changes in our glasses' prescription.  Annual eye examinations are recommended in order to monitor these natural changes and to make the timely decision for surgical extraction of the cataract.

Diabetic Retinopathy
Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in adults 20 to 74 years old.  The American Diabetes Association recommends dilated eye examinations every year because diabetes affects the tiny blood vessels in the back of the eye.  Diabetes can cause these small blood vessel to leak or bleed in the eye, as well as eye swelling, which can lead to vision loss.  It is estimated that one-third of Americans who have diabetes don't know it. We may detect the disease before your primary care physician does, especially if you're overdue for a physical.  Early detection can prevent permanent vision loss.

Macular Degeneration
Macular Degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in adults 55 and older.  Early detection is critical as there are now new treatments available to stall vision loss and in some cases restore lost vision.

Dry Eye Syndrome
The tears your eyes produce are necessary for overall eye health and clear vision. Dry eye means that your eyes do not produce enough tears or that you produce tears which do not have the proper chemical composition. Often, dry eye is part of the natural aging process. It can also be caused by blinking or eyelid problems, medications like antihistamines, oral contraceptives and antidepressants, a dry climate, wind and dust, general health problems like arthritis or Sjogren's syndrome and chemical or thermal burns to your eyes. 
If you have dry eye, your symptoms may include irritated, scratchy, dry, uncomfortable or red eyes, a burning sensation or feeling of something foreign in your eyes and blurred vision. Excessive dry eyes may damage eye tissue, scar your cornea (the front covering of your eyes) and impair vision and make contact lens wear difficult. 
If you have symptoms of dry eye, see your us for a comprehensive examination. Dry eye cannot be cured, but we can prescribe treatment so your eyes remain healthy and your vision is unaffected. Some treatments that we might prescribe include increasing humidity at home or work, using artificial tears and/or a moisturizing ointment, especially at bedtime. In some cases, small plugs are inserted in the corner of the eyes to slow tear drainage. Sometimes, surgical closure of the drainage ducts may be recommended. 

We Fit Many Types of Contact Lenses:



Daily Disposable Soft Lenses

Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses (RGP)


Toric (Astigmatism)


Bifocal and Multifocal Lenses


Cosmetic Tinted Lenses



Contact Lens Compliance Agreement

By following your doctor's recommendations, you can effectively reduce the risk of any contact lens related problems and ensure contact lenses remain a safe and effective form of vision correction.

It is important to replace lenses as often as prescribed by your doctor, even when proper hygiene measures are being followed.  This will decrease your risk of infection, while increasing the comfort and vision for the duration of the lenses.

Only select contact lenses are FDA approved for wear during sleep.  Avoid even napping in your contacts unless specified by your eye doctor.

Store brand (generic) solutions are NOT the same as the recommended solutions that are prescribed for our patients.  Saline solutions and rewetting drops are NOT designed to disinfect contact lenses.

As with any medical device, hygiene plays a key role in the safety of the product.  Pay particular attention to the cleanliness of your hands, contacts, and the contact lens case.  Any contaminants found on these surfaces may get into the eyes upon insertion of the lenses.

Always wash your hands before handling the contact lenses; i.e. before insertion and before removal.

Lenses should be cleaned immediately upon removal from the eye.  Even patients using "No-Rub" solutions are to rub both sides of the contacts for 5-10 seconds.

The previous night's dirty solution should be discarded after insertion of the contact lenses.

Fresh solution should be used each time the lens is placed in the case.

NEVER re-use old solution left in the case after removing lenses.

The case should be rinsed clean and air dried between disinfection cycles.

Replace your case every 3 months to reduce the risk of infection.  *Reminder Tip* When you replace your toothbrush, replace your lens case.


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